Rialto Bridge

S. Calatrava's Constitution bridge

The Canal Grande under the Ponte della Costituzione

The Canal Grande from Papadopoli's Gardens

The Canal Grande seen from the Cà d'Oro

...from the Rialto bridge

...from the Accademia bridge
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Il Canal Grande

           

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Rialto Bridge


immagine didascalia

S. Calatrava's Constitution bridge


immagine didascalia

The Canal Grande under the Ponte della Costituzione


immagine didascalia

The Canal Grande from Papadopoli's Gardens


immagine didascalia

The Canal Grande seen from the Cà d'Oro


immagine didascalia

...from the Rialto bridge


immagine didascalia

...from the Accademia bridge


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The Canal Grande

The Canal Grande  (or Canalazzo, as the Venetians affectionately call it) is a natural canal formed over the centuries by the trench created by an old river running into the sea and the flood tide. It is about 3800 metres long and 5 metres deep, while its width varies from 30 to 70 metres.

The “S” shaped Canal Grande divides the city of Venice into two. Originally it was used like a portuale harbour for goods arriving by sea to be sold at the Rialto market.
A vital centre for the State’s trade  until the Middle Ages, the Canal Grande gradually became the favoured position for the rich merchants and nobles to build their Palaces.

A trip today along the Canal Grande by “vaporetto” (water-bus) or gondola is an spectacular experience, letting one relive the whole history) of the Serenissima.
In fact, starting from the North-East at Piazzale Roma and the railway station, both sides of the canal are flanked by splendid palaces and buildings, such as Palazzo Labia, the Fondaco dei Turchi, the Deposito del MegioCa’ Vendramin CalergiCa’ TronCà Pesaro, the Ca' d'oroCà Da MostoFabbriche Nuove of Rialto, the Fondaco dei Tedeschi, Riva del VinCa’ GrimaniPalazzo PisaniCa' FoscariPalazzo GrassiCa' Rezzonico, as well as various churches, such as S. MarcuolaSan StaeSanta Maria della Salute.

With its four bridges, the most famous being the Rialto Bridge, Canal Grande is still the main waterway in Venice, where many of the traditional Venetian ceremonies and festivities take place, such as the Historic Regatta.

Today’s huge increase in tourism and, needless to say, motor boats mean that several problems now afflict the Canal Grande, such as high levels of pollution and surging long wave (“onda lunga”).


1600 - 1700  -   - rev. 0.1.16

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